The End of DACA

While the Trump Administration announced the end of DACA today, September 5, 2017, there is a six month window (to March 5, 2018) during which Congress must act to protect those who now hold DACA status.  Contact your representatives to express your support for DACA!

Nobody’s DACA status will be revoked before it expires, administration officials said, and any applications already received by today will be processed.

Anyone who’s status expires by March 5 has one month to apply for a new two-year permit, and those applications will be processed.

Initial DACA Applications: USCIS will adjudicate properly filed initial DACA requests and associated applications for work authorization that were accepted by USCIS as of September 5, 2017. USCIS will reject any initial DACA requests received after September 5, 2017.

Renewal DACA Applications: USCIS will adjudicate renewal DACA applications and associated applications for work authorization that have been accepted by USCIS as of September 5, 2017. Until October 5, 2017USCIS will also continue to accept renewal applications filed by DACA recipients whose benefits expire on or before March 5, 2018. USCIS will reject all DACA renewal requests that do not fit these parameters, including all applications received after October 5, 2017.

Applications for Advance Parole Based on DACA Grants: Effective September 5, 2017, USCIS will not approve any DACA-based applications for Advance Parole (Forms I-131). Any pending applications for advance parole will be administratively closed, and USCIS will refund the filing fees. Although DHS also stated that it will generally honor the validity period for previously approved applications for advance parole, remember that CBP retains the right to refuse admission to a person who presents themselves at a port of entry as a matter of discretion.

Oppose the RAISE Act!

Strongly oppose the RAISE Act!  Among other things, the RAISE Act:

  • Aims to cut immigration by at least half from current levels without a reasonable correlation to family reunification or the economic needs of our nation and which would mark a major shift in U.S. immigration law
  • Creates a “points-based” system that fails to take into account the needs of U.S. businesses
  • All but eliminates family-based immigration, by restricting U.S. citizens and permanent residents to sponsoring only spouses and minor children for green cards
  • Reduces the number of refugees admitted to the U.S. to 50,000 per year, contrary to our nation’s proud tradition of serving as a beacon of hope for people fleeing persecution
  • Ends the Diversity Immigrant Visa Program which has awarded 50,000 green cards annually to people from countries with historically low rates of immigration to the U.S.

Dream Act of 2017 Introduced to Congress – Show Support for This Bill!

Today (July 20, 2017), a bipartisan bill called the Dream Act of 2017 was introduced by Senators Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and Dick Durbin (D-IL). The Dream Act of 2017 would provide young people who were brought to this country as children and grew up in the United States the chance to apply for lawful permanent residence, if they meet certain requirements.

Tell Congress to support this bill!  https://www.congress.gov/contact-us